In this project I expand on an earlier project, 180 Degrees, by photographing the same scene, or subject, from two opposing angles.

In this project I expand on an earlier project, 180 Degrees, by photographing the same scene, or subject, from two opposing angles. I prefer subjects that are inherently boring or simply overlooked, such as a crumbling wall, a single tree or a road underpass. I’ve often been surprised by how similar the image appears, even though it’s shot from its polar opposite viewpoint.

In this project I expand on an earlier project, 180 Degrees, by photographing the same scene, or subject, from two opposing angles. I prefer subjects that are inherently boring or simply overlooked, such as a crumbling wall, a single tree or a road underpass. I’ve often been surprised by how similar the image appears, even though it’s shot from its polar opposite viewpoint. This makes me curious how a variation in the camera location impacts the photographic outcome and reflects my long-time interest in shifting our point of view, visiting the other side, understanding there is more to the story than one angle, or reflecting on the simple notion that one image can tell a whole story. By creating a diptych in this case, I am presenting the underlying relationship of sameness. The flip sides of the same coin.

Here, There (or Opposite Ends)
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